Tag Archives: Summer Internship

A Cinematic Summer

Hi everyone!  My name is Michael Kurt, and I am a second-year at Booth with the privilege of sharing my experience at this amazing place through this blog.  As a creative director with fellow second-year Gaspar Betancourt, I will be incorporating engaging, visual elements into the blog to bring students’ perspectives to life.  We’re all about having fun and developing ideas here at Booth, which inspired me to share my summer with you through the following poem.  Enjoy!

Summer 2015 was an amazing time,
And I’d like to share it with you through the following rhyme.

I interned with Paramount Pictures in Hollywood,
And my time with the historic film studio was incredibly good.

Continue reading A Cinematic Summer

What’s In My Bag? Summer Internship Edition

Hi everyone! I’m Faria Jabbar, a second year at Booth. I’m excited to share my Booth experience with you over the course of this year, and hopefully help you imagine what your own Booth experience could look like. It’s hard to predict what this year will bring, but expect a lot of posts from me about marketing, exploring Chicago, and my interest in retail/style.

As of now, I stand on the other side of some of the most fun and intense 10 weeks I’ve ever had. This summer I had the opportunity to make the switch from marketing consulting to the brand marketing, working as a marketing intern at Nestle’s Ice Cream division in Oakland, CA. Specifically, I worked on developing a Marketing Plan for a No Sugar Added ice cream, as well as a shelf schematic (determining ice cream flavors that should be on shelf in the grocery store).

A big question mark I had before starting school was around the summer internship – what do you actually do? The answer varies a lot depending on the internship – but hopefully a look at what was in my bag this summer will provide some insight into the world of brand marketing.

Continue reading What’s In My Bag? Summer Internship Edition

Sympathy for the Intern: an intro post

Please allow me to introduce myself, I am a man of unconventional taste. I am not the stereotypical Boothie, I have not recruited for banking nor management consulting. I do not understand NFL’s rules and do not live in MPP. So, if you expect to learn about Wall Street networking, I am sorry to disappoint you. I will be sharing my experiences at Booth from the eyes of a passionate nerd. Often enough, I will be writing about the Soccer Club, off-campus recruiting, life as an international student, the social scene, Innovation Consulting, Random Walk, long-distance relationships, and food.

Continue reading Sympathy for the Intern: an intro post

Challenging Everything: A Boothie’s Bogotá VC Internship Experience

William K. Lee is a rising second-year student at Chicago Booth. This summer he was an intern at Polymath Ventures, an innovative company builder in Bogotá, Colombia, and he shares some of his experiences in this interview. Prior to Booth, he worked as a software engineer for Bay Area Internet companies including eBay and Wikia. He came to Booth because he wanted to shift to the business and management sides of technology, so his summer internship gave him a great opportunity to practice the high-level skills he has developed in business school. Moreover, the opportunity allowed him to step out of his comfort zone and tackle new challenges in a new place. Will is active in the entrepreneurship scene at Booth and in Chicago and is a Co-Chair of the Booth Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital Group (EVC) for this coming year. Outside of school, Will is training for October’s Chicago Marathon (his sixth) and enjoys playing bar trivia with other Boothies.

–Matt Richman
 
Where did you work this summer and what was your role?
I worked in Bogotá, Colombia, at Polymath Ventures. Polymath designs and builds companies from the ground up that serve the needs of the middle class in emerging markets. This summer I was a technology advisor and product manager for one of Polymath’s companies, Táximo. Táximo is trying to reinvent the taxi industry in Latin America by making the customer experience safer and more convenient.
What are some resources you took advantage of at Booth that helped you land the job?
The Entrepreneurship concentration at Booth was instrumental in securing my summer internship. I first heard about the job opportunity from the newsletter of the Entrepreneurship & Venture Capital Group. Once I got the offer, I turned to the Entrepreneurial Internship Program (EIP) from Booth’s Polsky Center for further assistance. EIP offers grants to students like me who want to work at cash-strapped startups.
What was the highlight of your summer internship?
I was in charge of hiring a software developer. At first I tried the regular recruiting channels, such as posting on job websites, but they proved fruitless. The next step I took really threw me out of my comfort zone. I went to several software engineering Meetups in Bogotá in order to meet talented developers in person. I planned on attending just the events’ networking sessions, but I ended up participating in the interactive Spanish-language portions, too. Imagine trying to talk about Big Data with just high-school level Spanish! Nevertheless I am glad I got to experience these Meetups not just because they helped with recruiting but because they informed me about the startup scene in Colombia and connected me with tech entrepreneurs.
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Will attending a tech Meetup at a Bogotá co-working space
Were there any transformative aspects of the experience that will help you structure your final year at Booth?
I thoroughly enjoyed the experience of working closely with company founders to advise them on technology issues. I liked drawing on my technical background and also pushing myself to think strategically. I would like to have a role like this after I graduate from Booth. This could be partnering with an entrepreneur for a startup or serving as advisor-in-residence at a startup incubator or accelerator. In my final year at Booth, I plan on participating in entrepreneurial activities and taking many entrepreneurship and general management courses, such as New Venture Strategy.
How was your Spanish before the internship? 
I studied Spanish for four years in high school, but it was very rusty when I landed in Colombia. This wasn’t a problem for work because my colleagues used English in the office. Still, I tried to improve my Spanish. I got involved in Spanish-English language exchanges and listened to podcasts. Now it’s pretty good—yesterday I tuned into a Spanish radio station and understood an announcement for a supermarket sale!
Did you get a chance to explore Bogotá and Colombia? What was your favorite experience outside of work?
Bogotá had a host of things to do this summer. I enjoyed going out into my neighborhood and discovering nice restaurants, hole-in-the-wall eateries, cafes, and bars. I also ran a lot this summer for marathon training, so I got to explore many parks and districts on foot. I created a Google map of my favorite places, which was a big hit around the office. I tried to break out of the city’s large expat scene by meeting locals through various channels. They were very friendly and invited me to special events like a wine expo and an outdoor rock festival. My favorite experience of the summer was spending a weekend in Medellín, Colombia’s second city. I enjoyed its fantastic weather, met its outgoing people, and reveled in its vibrant nightlife.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Will and another Polymath intern sampling some reds at a wine expo in Bogotá
How did your first year at Booth help you get the most out of your summer?
When I decided to pursue my summer internship at Polymath in Colombia, I took the Booth motto of “Challenge Everything” to heart. In my work, I used skills I developed in my first year coursework to perform extensive analysis on every claim I encountered. My colleagues appreciated the level of rigor I applied to my job. At a higher level, I challenged myself by taking the risk of working in an emerging market that I had known little about. The safe move would have been working for a startup in the Bay Area, where I’d lived for most of my life, where I planned to return after Booth, and where I would have formed connections seemingly more beneficial for my short-term goals. But conversations with faculty, second-year students, and industry professionals that I met on Booth-organized career treks helped me see that a summer in Colombia could be just as rewarding. I’m glad I chose Bogotá. Not only was it a unique life experience, it opened my eyes to the business opportunities there and gave me insights into entrepreneurship that will serve me well in my career (and which you can read about here). 

Diary of an Investment Banking Intern in the Big Apple

While some students come to Booth to transition into finance, others use their MBAs as a platform to take their finance skills and careers to another level. One such Booth student, Yvanna Pérez Morel, worked in M&A advisory in the Dominican Republic, her home country, before business school. This summer, she interned both at BofA Merrill Lynch (Investment Banking, Consumer & Retail) in New York and at Mesoamerica (Private Equity, Food & Beverage Portfolio) in Colombia. This coming year, Yvanna will participate in the exchange program with London Business School as part of the International MBA that she is pursuing at Chicago Booth. During her free time, she enjoys going to the beach, playing squash, and horseback riding in the mountains. 

Below, Yvanna recounts her whirlwind summer internship in banking in New York, and how Booth equipped her with the skills to succeed.

–Matt Richman

After ten weeks as an investment banking intern in the Big Apple, I can fully understand why people say that New York never sleeps – I didn’t! Here’s a quick summary of my busy days (and nights) since my last day at Booth – searching for knowledge in finance and a full-time offer.

As an investment banking intern my life revolved around the blinking red light on my corporate Blackberry, but in my experience, every minute was a new opportunity to learn on assignments including Hudson Bay’s acquisition of Saks Fifth Avenue, a high yield debt issuance for Carter’s, and a not-yet-public IPO. I honed technical skills such as modeling, got deeply immersed in industry-specific dynamics and strategies as a Consumer & Retail coverage banker, and observed the way senior bankers managed their client relationships.

Those interested in pursuing an investment banking track will find that Booth provides all that is needed for a successful summer:

1) Academic courses: Booth’s unique flexible curriculum allows students to choose courses such as Accounting and Financial Statement Analysis I & II (“Footnote Accounting” and “M&A Accounting”), Cases in Financial Management, and Cases in Corporate Governance, that prepare them for a great summer and a successful career in the financial services industry. YOU chart your learning path. While I had some experience in finance prior to Booth, taking advanced finance and accounting classes in my first year made me confident I could tackle anything technical that came up during the internship.

2) Career Services: This team works day and night to manage the relationships with the different banks and to make sure everyone is well-prepared for interviews through events such as weekend modeling courses by Training the Street (TTS) and “wInterview,” and facilitated some great sessions to give us the tools to be successful during the summer, once we landed the internship offer.

3) Investment Banking Group (IBG): A student-run group which works closely with Career Services, the IBG coordinates different initiatives for first year students to learn from second years’ experiences, from the industry-wide and bank-specific cultures to the dos and don’ts of getting a job in banking. I spent countless hours chatting with second years to get prepared for any challenges which might arise during the summer.

The summer was intense but also fun. Corporate events such as attending a Yankees baseball game with clients, having breakfast or lunch with senior bankers, playing kickball in Central Park with the team, and watching a Cirque du Soleil performance with other interns were a lot of fun and offered an opportunity for the firm to evaluate interns on interpersonal skills. Taking Professor Wortmann’s workshop on networking with senior executives showed me the implicit rules of the game, and allowed me to focus on having fun and asking the questions that I was genuinely interested in.

Of course, after an 18 hour a day, 7 day a week marathon, going out for a night was a must. Meeting Boothies working at other firms who understood my schedule (and probably had the same one) was just amazing! It was great to see some familiar faces and relax for a bit!

By the end of the summer, I got exactly what I wanted: I learned a lot, had fun, and, in case you were wondering, was fortunate enough to be extended an offer to return next year for a full-time job after graduating! Whether it was working, attending corporate events, or meeting friends for drinks in the Big Apple, the term “24/7” showed its true colors this summer. Here are some pictures of my personal experiences:

From top to bottom: Yankees game with clients, kickball with the team, Cirque du Soleil with interns and night out with other Boothies.