Tag Archives: #uchicago

Fresh Air Fund Inspires Boothies to Wander Campus

Back in October, we all received emails about Booth’s new Fresh Air Fund. I wasn’t sure what to expect: a fund dedicated to the environment? A reference to NPR’s podcast? No. The Fresh Air Fund is an effort by Booth to nudge us away from Harper and into our larger UChicago surroundings. As part of this, we have been given $60 in credit to dine, snack, and shop at campus cafes, markets, and dining halls. I tried out a few this quarter and walked away pleasantly surprised and eager to go back. Here are my top picks! 

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Getting Outside the Classroom: Fall Quarter Conferences

Even when we’re not in the classroom, Boothies are constantly learning. We seek out information and take every opportunity to explore new industries. During the Fall Quarter, Boothies attended a lot of conferences, both on campus and around the country. Here’s a quick look at the long list of conferences we have access to as Booth students.

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Modern Data Science vs Traditional Economics from Steven Levitt of Freakonomics

The University of Chicago is well-known for its rich economics program, producing rigorous academic research and six current Nobel Laureates (#notsohumblebrag). However, it’s not all just academia here. Steven Levitt, of Freakonomics fame, has been a professor at the University of Chicago since 1997. Levitt has arguably been the most publicly influential economist in the last 20 years through his best-selling popular economics literature, blog, and podcast.

A few weeks ago, through the Becker Brown Bag series, Levitt discussed a Booth student’s favorite topic—data—and how modern data science has introduced new approaches to data not traditionally seen in economics. Furthermore, Levitt introduced to the audience his next big project with ambitions to tangibly change the world.

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